Bizarre Sponsored Talk on 'Time AI' Encryption Tech Mocked at Black Hat Conference
Gizmodo.com - Sun 11 Aug 01:13 GMT

Attendees at the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas booed and ridiculed a sponsored talk on Thursday called “The 2019 Discovery of Quasi-Prime Numbers: What Does This Mean For Encryption?” that touted a bizarre technology called “Time AI,” Motherboard…

  Screenshot: Crown Sterling (YouTube) Attendees at the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas booed and ridiculed a sponsored talk on Thursday called “The 2019 Discovery of Quasi-Prime Numbers: What Does This Mean For Encryption?”

  that touted a bizarre technology called “Time AI,” Motherboard reported on Saturday, with the conference even going so far as to delete material on the talk from its website.

  According to Motherboard, the talk was delivered by Robert Grant of a company named Time Sterling, with attendees quickly accusing him of making bullshit claims about the technology and potentially defrauding users: People in attendance, as well as security researchers who were following it on Twitter, made fun of the talk and criticized the conference for letting Grant speak.

  In a video posted to YouTube by Crown Sterling, the company claims that it had identified “for the first time an infinitely predictable prime number pattern,” as well as rolled out buzzwords ranging from “infinite wave conjugations” and “quasi prime numbers” to the “nano-scale of time” and “speed of AI oscillations.”

  Cryptographer and former Facebook employee Steve Weis, who reviewed Crown Sterling informational materials, told Motherboard that its staff “look like scam artists.”

  As a sponsored talk, Crown Sterling’s presentation was subject to a lower level of pre-scrutiny than others speaking to the conference; a Black Hat spokesperson told the site via email that the conference is “aware of the situation with the Crown Sterling talk,” had removed the talk from their site, and is “working to implement a stronger vetting process moving forward to avoid this happening in the future.”

  Crown Sterling told Motherboard that it stands by “the accuracy of the talk and will continue to do so.”